5 √úber Cool Bikes | Cycling Culture in Europe

 

Being from the U.S. where it’s common practice to drive a couple blocks to the corner store for a gallon of milk, relying on your two feet as a means for transportation is something our country could learn a little more about.  I will admit that I am absolutely intrigued by the biking culture in several of Europe’s largest cities.  A broad spectrum of bi(tri+ axles)cycles can be observed pedaling along the busy, metropolitan streets on any given day. While you may have to do a double take upon catching sight of some of these funky looking, multi-wheeled vehicles whirling by, but be assured that each one serves a utilitarian purpose.

The Dog Trike

Alistair Marks (A veterinarian and avid cyclist) from Edinburgh faced the dilemma of having to drive to work if he wanted his two pups (Peta and Biba) to  safely accompany him to his practice.  Unfortunately this was burning up petrol (which costs about $10 per gallon) and doubling his daily commute time.  The solution?  A dog trike, of course!  Alistair custom built a bike featuring two heavy-duty wheels and a large dog crate in the front.  When a steep hill comes his way, there is a battery operated motor that will assist with the climb.

 

 

The Beer Bike

First, it should be noted that the experienced guide steering this bar on wheels is also the vehicle’s official designated driver, and there is bartender in charge of responsibly serving those partaking in the tour.  The beer bike offers people a unique way to see the city of Amsterdam while pedal powering the craft and enjoying cold, amber brew at the same time.

Streamlined Scandinavian Cargo Bike

Erik Nohlin (Industrial Designer MFA) has improved and modernized the form of a typical cargo bike.¬† He has applied the principals of Swedish minimalist design (think IKEA) to the old, carrier style and has created a streamlined version of it.¬† Why is his work considered so innovative?¬† Aside from today‚Äôs European communities that embrace bike culture, it is more convenient, economical, and green to use than an automobile.¬† When gas prices are at nearly $10 per gallon and the charming (yet congested) narrow streets of city centres can‚Äôt accommodate cumbersome delivery trucks, well, it just makes sense to refine the cargo bike to meet and exceed people’s transporting needs.

 

The Velotaxi

Let someone else will do the pedaling for you.  You can find this ultra-modern version of the classic (buggy like) rickshaw all throughout Europe (and the world).

Copenhagen Cargo Bikes from Streetfilms on Vimeo.

Forget the Mini Van and the SUV

Fit a family of five all on one bike?¬† No problem!¬† Biking in cities (like Copenhagen and Amsterdam) is a way of life.¬† These bustling metropolises have more people who pedal to their destinations than drive, and there is a respectful coexistence between bikers and those driving automobiles.¬† Should you decide to partake Amsterdam or Copenhagen‚Äôs excellent bike share programs, make sure that you are familiar with the location specific bike etiquette first. Once you have become acclimated to the local road rules, you will truly begin to appreciate the beauty of European bike culture. If cycling just isn’t your thing, no need to worry Auto Europe will help you to find the best car rental rates.

 

 

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Written by 1800FlyEurope

One Response to “5 √úber Cool Bikes | Cycling Culture in Europe”

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